Author: Domaining

Dubai Business Women Council (DBWC) recently hosted a fireside chat with Teresa Carlson, the vice president Worldwide Public Sector, Amazon Web Services (AWS), and one of the most accomplished forwarding-thinking technology leaders in the world.

As the founder and leader of AWS Worldwide Public Sector, Carlson has helped change mindsets of both individuals and organizations around the world modernize policies at all levels of government and cultivate a 21st century global workforce equipped with the skillset necessary to leverage the full potential of cloud to drive innovation.

During the discussion, Carlson talked about how tens of thousands of government agencies, education institutions, and nonprofit organizations around the world are using AWS today to pave the way for disruptive innovation and to make the world a better place.

She underscored AWS’s committed to the Middle East and its continued investment to support the region’s digital transformation across governments, enterprises, and startups. She also commended the UAE’s efforts, particularly in the public sector, in fostering entrepreneurship and driving a culture of innovation.

Carlson noted that while the rapid pace of innovation creates expansive economic development opportunities, the shortage of the right skills put governments and businesses at risk to succeed over the long-term in the new digital economy.

She highlighted that as the Middle East looks to become digitized, governments, private enterprises, and educational and nonprofit organizations all have a role to play in bridging the skills gap in order to reap the benefits of technology. For that reason, AWS is making significant investments in education, training, and certification programs to help advance technical skills in the Middle East.

As a strong advocate for empowering women in the technology field, Carlson also outlined her belief that gender inclusion and diversity are key to driving innovation. Her passion lead to the creation of “We Power Tech,” AWS’s diversity and inclusion initiative, which has been extended to the region, providing events and free training courses to support technology skills development for women in the Middle East.

Nadine Halabi, business development manager at DBWC, said: “DBWC is thrilled to host AWS and Teresa Carlson as part of our continued commitment to providing quality training, mentoring and guidance to the council’s members.”

“Hosting such high-quality seminars with the presence of influential and successful figures in the business world is important to inspire and guide businesswomen and female entrepreneurs in the UAE.

 

Read more at: TradeArabia

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Even though Arabic language is booming and is one of the fastest-growing languages globally, it is still facing access challenges online.

In 2013, Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) rolled out domain names in Arabic, Chinese, German, Russian and Cyrillic scripts.

When Russian and Chinese Top-Level Domain names have grown in leaps and bounds, Arabic domain names and country code top-level domain (ccTLD) of UAE (.emarat), Arabic equivalent of .AE domain extension, .Al Saudia for Saudia Arabia and .Misr for Egypt did not grow correspondingly and did not close the gap between the Arabic content and the Arabic user.

Top-Level Domains are letters after the final dot of a domain name like .com, .ae and .net while “.Shabaka” (in Arabic means .web) was the world’s first Arabic new Top-Level Domain (TLD).

Top industry experts said that the key reason is due to the lack of Arabic content online despite the growth in Arabic speaking population.

“The other reason is universal acceptance. Most of the e-commerce and online banking platforms accept emails in ASCII or Latin characters and does not recognise Arabic or Chinese email ID address. People go and register for domain names in Arabic but there is a limitation in how they could use the domain names because domain application of a domain name is email and if you want to use your email ID in your local language and if you are not able to do that, then it is a problem,” Baher Esmat, ICANN’s vice-president for stakeholder engagement in the Middle East, told TechRadar Middle East.

Despite great efforts from the ICANN and the domain managers in the countries to spread awareness on these domains, Munir Badr, Founder and CEO of AEServer, one of the accredited domain name registrars under the TRA for .ae, said that the general public and businesses, in general, prefer to use the common domain extensions in the English language as they are by far more popular, easy to type and use by everyone and in some cases cost less to register compared to the IDNs.

Esmat said that some Gulf Cooperation Council countries, apart from Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Morocco, Iraq, Sudan, Somalia have a large Arabic-only speaking population and they use mostly Arabic language on their mobile phones and social media.

From an ICANN’s point of view, he said that the organisation’s role is to ensure that domain names work securely and stably.

icann

 

Internet penetration rate in Middle East

“When communities around the world ask ICANN to make domain names in different languages, ICANN has to respond to their needs. Whether the domain names are working or not is ICANN’s business or our responsibility,” Esmatsaid.

According to ICANN, the largest country-level domain names, in terms of registrations, are China and Russia.

“When we have millions of domain names in China and Russia, we have less than 1,000 TLDs in Arabic in Saudi Arabia and other GCC countries. This may change as our region is the fastest-growing region on internet usage globally,” he said.

According to Internet World Stats, the Middle East had a population of 258.37m as of April last year and out of this, 175.50m are internet users, which translates to 4% of the total internet users globally.

The internet penetration rate in the Middle East stands at 67.2%, higher than the rest of the world at 56.5% and higher than the global average of 56.8%.

According to Ethnologue, Arabic is the fifth most spoken language in the world in 2019 with 319m after Chinese, Spanish, English and Hindi.

Badr said the low usage is mainly due to lack of interest from the registrants.

“If we look at Dubai in general, the language of business is English and with a high ex-pat population, many of the business decision-makers are well aware of the domains and had prior experience by using a generic domain name such as .com or .net or country-level domains (ccTLD) so they will opt for a .ae name and a .com name as a bundle and both in Roman script,” he said.

On the other hand, he said that .ae is one of the best performing domains in the Mena region with over 230,000 domain names registered and is extremely popular within the UAE and it is also cost-effective and easy to register.

However, he said that there is lack of awareness and no big or well-known brands or government agencies are using such domains.

 

Read more on Tech Radar.

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The use of new technologies has largely contributed to enhancing Abu Dhabi’s security and hence the city has been ranked the safest in the world, an official with the Abu Dhabi Police has said.

Captain Ali Hassan Al Madfaei, division manager, Abu Dhabi Police Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) administration, said year on year, Abu Dhabi security has been boosted by the introduction of new technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI), cameras, sensors, drones and smart traffic systems to detect and control crimes and to improve safety on the roads.

Last month, Abu Dhabi was named the safest city in the world for the fourth year in a row. Abu Dhabi was ranked first in the list brought out by crowd-sourced global data website Numbeo. It topped the list ahead of 376 cities from around the world.

“From road systems developed to monitor traffic to systems that combat cybercrimes – these technological initiatives have made Abu Dhabi the safest city in the world,” Al Madfaei told Khaleej Times on the sidelines of the Ministry of Interior (MoI) Innovation and Police Technology Summit in Abu Dhabi on Tuesday.

“The Abu Dhabi Police have introduced cutting edge technologies and the latest development in robotics and AI in all areas of operations. The force uses monitoring and control devices in public and private facilities to prevent crime and maintain public security in the emirate.”

Read more at Khaleej Times

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